After you have been sewing for a while, you may have collected quite a few patterns along the way. Make sure that when you purchase a pattern, that you take good care of it, because once you have been sewing for a while you may want to try your hand at making your own patterns.
There may be certain aspects you like from different patterns, such as the sleeves on one, a collar on another, the bodice, or the skirt on another. By saving all your patterns, you can begin to mix and match these desired aspects to create your own original design. You can make copies of your original patterns on pelon, fabric such as muslin, or on unprinted newspaper that you can get from any newspaper publisher in bulk.
Often times they have end rolls that they are unable to use. These are great for copying your patterns and extending their life, cheaply. Any dressmaker can benefit from using a mock up pattern known as a fitting shell, standard pattern, or toile. A basic paper pattern is carefully adjusted to your personal measurements. It is cut out and tacked together in a fabric such as muslin. The mock garment is fitted carefully and accurately to your figure. After having this mock pattern constructed, all your new patterns can be compared with it before cutting and sewing to avoid mistakes. It may take longer to check the fit of each pattern this way but it can be worthwhile especially when details really matter. This way, you can always do a trail run on muslin before committing to the actual fabric you want your dress to be made from.
You can definitely combine two or more patterns to construct your own unique gown or dress, however it is best if they are all in the same size range unless you are very skilled in pattern adjustments. If in doubt, do it in muslin first. The problem with commercially made patterns is they are made for a nonspecific person, not for your unique figure. You may have to make several pattern adjustments to make a commercial pattern fit properly.
Another way you can form your own patterns is by garments you already own that you know fit you well. You can carefully disassemble the garment and trace it onto newsprint adding 12 inch for seam allowance. If you do not want to disassemble a currently owned garment, another option is to hit your local thrift stores and find garments that fit you nicely, regardless of the print or color. These will not matter. This is a cheap way to pick up garments that can be made into patterns for a customized dress pattern.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here